Lady Di Didn’t Deserve This

With all the talk going on about the new Broadway musical Diana, especially since its unconventional Netflix premiere earlier this month, I thought now was as good a time as any to get back to my blog. The internet has not been kind to this show. In fact, it has been met with nearly universal vitriol. So much so that I had already drawn two conclusions before I began to examine it for this post: first, that I wouldn’t have anything to add to the larger conversation, and second, that I had read so much bad press on the work that I was fully prepared to listen to the cast album with low expectations.

If my life had an audible narrator, this is the part where they would say “he was not prepared.”

Diana is a new musical with music and lyrics by the team who gave us Memphis, David Bryan and Joe DiPietro. Joe DiPietro also wrote the book. If the name David Bryan rings any bells you may recognize him as the keyboardist from Bon Jovi. The show was set to open in March of 2020, but the COVID-19 pandemic has delayed it. However, it was professionally filmed at the Longacre Theatre last year and can now be streamed on Netflix. As of today, Diana has yet to officially open on Broadway.

Now, I have not seen the Netflix pro-shoot of Diana because I really try and focus only on cast albums here. And judging solely by the cast album, I can say with certainty that this show deserves every ounce of criticism that it gets. The music is ridiculous, the lyrics unbearable, and the performances seem ripped from a sketch comedy show. What’s left? The orchestrations? Ha! Don’t get me started. The whole thing had me scratching my head as I tried to make out whether Diana was intended as a work of satire. It’s a wonder it made it out of workshops, let alone to Broadway!

Here the British royal family belts out songs that would be at home on a Kidz Bop Goes Rock Opera album while the People’s Princess navigates her life around villains Charles (whom she calls “a third rate Henry VIII”) and Camilla (“Godzilla”). The only song with any real charm is Diana’s ballad “I Will.” Aside from that, this album is saturated with the worst tunes and lyrics you’ve ever heard. Yes, even worse than that. And it’s an hour and nineteen minutes long! What gives it the right? Indeed, any one of the Rusical episodes of RuPaul’s Drag Race would have put out a better cast album than this.

Diana still awaits an opening night (November 2, in case you’re a masochist). I think I’ll skip the pro-shoot after all. Heck, I may even move to London where I’ll be safe from this monstrosity. Heaven knows it will never play the West End.

Musical: Diana

Music and Lyrics: David Bryan and Joe DiPietro

Cast Album I Listened To: 2021 Original Broadway Cast

Highlight: “I Will”

Overall Impression: The real Diana was too good a person to be memorialized with this mess.

Good Grief!

If there is one piece of American pop culture that has been a constant throughout my life, it’s the Peanuts comic strip. Not only the strips themselves, but the television specials, books, and licensed memorabilia have always had a prominent spot in my home. Who doesn’t love Snoopy, Charlie Brown, and the rest of the gang? Nobody worth knowing, that’s who. So, seeing as there is a famous musical based on Peanuts, I decided to visit it for this project as an excuse to finally listen to all of its cast albums. It’s a show I’m very familiar with, and it even contains one of my all-time favorite show tunes. I’m talking about You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown.

You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown began as a concept album with the blessing of Charles Schulz himself. This was followed by and Off-Broadway production in 1967, which was a smash hit and ran for 1,597 performances. Its 1971 Broadway run was less successful, closing in less than a month. But that hasn’t tarnished the endearing reputation of composer Clark Gesner’s labor of love. It has since been produced many times all over the world and yielded an impressive five cast albums, though I was only able to get my hands on four of them.

The first is the concept album, which was released in 1966. The story behind this album is sweet: Clark Gesner sent Charles Schulz (the creator of Peanuts) a demo recording of songs based on the beloved Peanuts characters and Schulz liked them so he granted permission to record them professionally. The rest is history. Now, I’ll admit that I was not excited about listening to the concept album. I wanted to get it over with before I ever hit play. Imagine my surprise when I realized it was a very charming album. It features full orchestrations and a decent cast, even if they aren’t always in character. I can see why this album led to the musical’s stage inception, something that wasn’t Gesner’s original intention. A very pleasant surprise indeed.

I am absolutely positive that I’ve heard the 1967 original Off-Broadway cast album before. I must have. The problem is, I couldn’t remember anything about it. Upon my first listen for this project, I understand why that might be; it’s pretty forgettable. For starters, there are no orchestrations to speak of, just a piano, percussion, and bass. Second, they stack all the boring songs at the beginning. Things pick up by the fifth track, “Kite,” but the damage is done. I already want to listen to the concept album again. Yes, this cast album features five more songs than the concept album, but the only standout of these is “Queen Lucy,” in which the perpetually crabby character laments the obstacles to her sitting on a throne. The lyrics are quite the character study and prove that Gesner is a genuine Peanuts fan. And Reva Rose is the strongest Lucy of the four I’ll hear, too. That said, “Queen Lucy” is more a dialogue that a song in the true sense of the word. All things considered, this is not a terrible album, just kind of a snooze fest compared to its predecessor.

There is a recording of the 1973 television cast somewhere out there, but I couldn’t find it. Hopefully it will be available to stream soon, or else I’ll have to hunt down a copy on vinyl. Either way, I’ll get there eventually. As it stands, we have to move on to the 1999 Broadway revival. This version was heavily revised from the 1971 production and is credited with helping to launch the career of Kristin Chenoweth, who played the new role of Sally. The cast here is brimming with legends. We’ve got Anthony Rapp as Charlie Brown, Roger Bart as Snoopy, and BD Wong as Linus. All are on top of their game to make this the quintessential You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown cast album. Without question, the album’s highlight is “My New Philosophy,” a new song performed by Chenoweth and one of my absolute favorites from any musical. The return of proper orchestrations doesn’t hurt, either. In fact, the only mark against this album is that “Queen Lucy” is not included. But the good news? You won’t miss it.

Until I did this project, I did not know that there was a 2016 cast album released by the company of the Off-Broadway revival. It is unique in that it stars young actors, making it immediately reminiscent of the television specials. It also features plenty of nods to Vince Guaraldi, who composed the soundtracks to the early specials. This album even features the famous horn sounds that substitute for adult voices. Indeed, it is a love letter to the specials and seems to honor them more than it does the original strip. Not that there’s anything wrong with that, but I like that simple charm that comes when the inspiration is the comic strip. Plus, I prefer the score to focus on Gesner’s work and leave Guaraldi’s out of it. It is a cute album nonetheless.

You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown does not have an outstanding score, an especially large fanbase, or an ever-present legacy. What it has is a lot of love for its subject, and that’s more than most shows can say. When done right, it’s not overproduced or gimmicky. It’s simple, elegant, and entertaining, just like the strips that Charles Schulz started drawing more than 70 years ago. And that’s enough for me.

Musical: You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown

Music and Lyrics: Clark Gesner

Opening Night Off-Broadway: March 7, 1967, at Theatre 80

Cast Albums I Listened To: 1966 Concept, 1967 Original Off-Broadway, 1999 Broadway Revival, and 2016 Off-Broadway Cast Albums.

My Favorite Cast Album: 1999 Broadway Revival Cast Album

Highlights: “My New Philosophy,” “Little Known Facts,” and “Suppertime.”

Honorable Mention: “Queen Lucy”

Overall Impression: This can be an endearing show, but Schulz’s creation is famously delicate and this medium is no exception.

Why Animals Don’t Drive

I grew up in a home with an abundance of children’s literature on hand. We had everything from The Very Hungry Caterpillar to Amelia Bedelia to Winne the Pooh, but one piece of kids’ lit that never entered my sphere of consciousness was The Wind in the Willows. Kenneth Grahame’s 1908 novel about a joy riding toad and his friends who try (and fail) to keep him out of trouble was just never on my parents’ radar. Well, my random number generator decided that my unfamiliarity ends now. Today, I’m writing about the cast album for the 2016 London stage adaptation of The Wind in the Willows.

This musical has music by George Stiles, lyrics by Anthony Drewe, and a book by Julian Fellowes. It debuted on October 8, 2016 at the Theatre Royal in Plymouth and had a limited run at the London Palladium from June through September of 2017. The Wind in the Willows follows the plot of the novel quite closely, with the anthropomorphized characters Rat and Mole doing everything in their power to keep their friend Mr. Toad from stealing automobiles and driving them at top speed; of course they can’t keep him away from the cars and Toad crashes several of them, landing himself in jail. It’s a surprisingly entertaining story given the quaint Edwardian setting and my initial impression based on the familiar artwork dominated with shades of brown and green. After familiarizing myself with the story, I was excited to listen to the album.

I have to say, it did not disappoint. The Wind in the Willows has some fun and even some beautiful music. The lyrics will give unfamiliar listeners a good idea of what’s going on in the show, a good thing with any classic adaptation, and the music even mimics Kenneth Grahame’s novel in how it alternates between the slower chorus numbers and more speedy action packed songs. The album features some great performances as well, especially Rufus Hound as Toad who sounds generally delighted to have discovered cars on “The Open Road.” I also love Denise Welch as Mrs. Otter. In fact, her “Speed is of the Essence” might be my favorite song in the show. I say “might be” because the adorable “A Friend is Still a Friend,” while dripping with saccharine, is inescapably endearing. It’s also one of my favorites.

This is a cast album I never would have listened to if I hadn’t done this project. I’m glad I did! The Wind in the Willows can best be described as a cute show, that’s for sure. But it has some really funny moments as well. For example, one lyric has Toad quip “When I anthropomorphized I did it rather well,” a tongue in cheek reference to the condition of these woodland creatures. Now, since it’s based on a children’s story, the musical is probably best suited for families and with the good amount of story on the cast album, I would recommend young families give it a spin together. That’s not to say adults can’t enjoy it on their own,it just goes to show that The Wind in Willows remains a classic story for all ages.

Musical: The Wind in the Willows

Cast Album I Listened To: 2016 Original London Cast

Music: George Stiles

Lyrics: Anthony Drewe

Opening Performance: October 8, 2016, Theatre Royal, Plymouth, UK

Highlights: “Speed is of the Essence,” “The Open Road,” and “A Friend is Still a Friend.”

Overall Impression: A surprisingly enjoyable album that makes excellent use of the show’s source material. The Wind in the Willows caught me off guard, but in a good way.

Una Verdadera Obra Maestra

Every once in a while, I am introduced to a musical and genuinely like it, but then go on to ignore it for way too long after that initial spark dies out. One such victim of this unjust habit of mine is In the Heights. So, when my trusty random number generator landed on it the other day, I was ecstatic! “Here’s my chance,” I said to me, “to renew my love for this masterpiece! And this time, I am not throwing away my sh–,” wait… wrong musical. But the reference is apt considering my attitude towards the show had cooled considerably and now is just as fresh as ever, maybe even more so!

In the Heights is probably most famous for being the first major work of theatre to feature music and lyrics by Lin-Manuel Miranda. The book, by Quiara Alegría Hudes, lays out a complicated plot concerning a small Dominican community who live on a corner in the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan. The show opened on Broadway on March 9, 2008, and successfully ran until closing in January of 2011. It was nominated for an astounding 13 Tony Awards and took home four, including Best Musical and Best Original Score. There was also a hit production in the West End as well as several others around the world, but the original Broadway production is the only one with a cast album. So, let’s talk about it.

The first few notes of the In the Heights cast album speak to the heart of every show tune enthusiast the world over. That’s because they harken back to West Side Story, emulating the beginning notes of “America.” It beautifully sets the theme before a single lyric is sung. Right away, we know that we are about to observe a world full of people with a marginalized identity who are vacillating between two cultures. Honestly, it’s one of my favorite beginnings to a musical and the rest of the album does not disappoint either. The music is a wonderful mix of hip-hop, pop, and salsa, and the lyrics explore the souls of the characters so thoroughly that you may actually think you’re in Washington Heights! To get that from a cast album is pretty magical and a testament to Lin-Manuel Miranda’s talent as a songwriter.

I had a very hard time choosing my song highlights this time because there isn’t a dud in the show. Before revisiting In the Heights for this project, I had forgotten how drawn I am to the second number on the album, which is “Breathe,” performed by the incredible Mandy Gonzalez as Nina. Its poignant theme of being disappointed in oneself yet determined to turn things around is enough to make is a shoo-in for my shortlist. Mandy Gonzalez’s performance doesn’t hurt, either. I also decided to go with the salsa infused “When You’re Home” and “Carnaval Del Barrio,” both of which had me dancing with each listen. The beautiful and sweet “Sunrise” is an absolute must listen and I decided to close out my picks with another heart-tugging Mandy Gonzalez performance, “Everything I Know.” Truth be told, the album is best enjoyed as a whole, but I think those five songs give a pretty good taste of this refreshing show.

If there is a drawback to this cast album, it’s the bonus tracks. Yes, I know I complained about bonus tracks in my last post as well, but that was about lazy placement. These here are redundant “radio mixes” that don’t add anything to the work. Still, everything before them is as perfect as can be, so I’ll happily let them slide.

All that said, we are leaving Washington Heights for now. But good news! We are finally getting an In the Heights film adaptation this year. I can’t wait to not only see it, but also talk about its soundtrack here. In the meantime, I am thankful to this blog for giving me cause to rediscover a real masterpiece of American theatre. In the Heights is as great as ever, even if it is a bit overshadowed by its younger brother.

Musical: In the Heights

Cast Album I Listened To: 2008 Original Broadway Cast

Music and Lyrics: Lin-Manuel Miranda

Opening Performance: March 9, 2008, Richard Rodgers Theatre, New York City

Highlights: “Breathe,” “When You’re Home,” “Sunrise,” “Carnaval Del Barrio,” and “Everything I Know.”

Overall Impression: As far as cast albums go, this one does a near perfect job of bringing you into the show’s world. I am excited to rediscover more shows that I have loved and grow my appreciation for them as I continue this project!

Two Nuns Walk Into a Cell…

The subtitle of this blog is “A Sprint Down Broadway,” but that’s really not accurate considering this is really a blog about cast albums, not Broadway musicals themselves. There are many cast albums from shows that haven’t run on Broadway and if I want to hear every cast album available, I can’t just stick to Broadway shows. So today I am writing about the cast album of In the Green. It’s a fairly new Off-Broadway musical, having run from June to August of 2019. The cast album was only released a few months ago and I decided to give it a listen.

Oh boy, is it a doozey.

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In the Green tells the story of Hildegard von Bingen, a twelfth century mystic and polymath who, quite honestly, is a fascinating person (I’d never heard of her before) and deserves to have her story told way more often. So, for that reason alone we owe a debt to composer, lyricist, and librettist Grace McLean. She chose a great subject and sent me down quite the Wikipedia rabbit hole.

The musical’s plot is concerned with the 30 years that Hildegard spent voluntarily locked in a monastery cell with her mentor Jutta von Sponheim. Well, it was voluntary on Jutta’s part; Hildegard was confined as a child at the behest of her family. But she stuck it out and now she’s recognized as a saint by the Catholic church, so maybe it worked out for her after all. Anyway, Jutta (pronounced Yuh-tuh) is played by McLean herself while Hildegard is played by three different actresses, each representing either her hands, her eyes, or her mouth. There is also a fifth actress on hand to play Shadow, the personification of Jutta’s darkest secrets. And that’s it. Refreshingly, this is a small cast of all women.

The music is definitely a departure from anything I’ve heard on this journey so far. The album opens with “O Virga ac Diadema,” which sound like an ancient hymn because, well, that’s exactly what it is. In fact, “O Virga ac Diadema” is one of two songs in the show whose lyrics were written by the real life Hildegard some 900 years ago. I think that’s pretty cool! I mean, hey, you’re not going to get that from Hamilton. Actually, for how modern the music is throughout the show, McLean does a pretty good job of giving it a medieval church music feel. She’s created a pop show but included plenty of chant motifs at the same time. The effect is somewhere between an ancient Mass and Hadestown, but still closer to the latter.

Especially chanty are the actresses playing Hildegard’s hands, eyes, and mouth: Rachael Duddy, Hannah Whitney, and Ashley Pérez Flanagan. These three mostly speak in unison as they are different parts of the same “broken” entity. We’re lucky for that because the actresses’ voices harmonize beautifully together. Actually, all five actresses give gorgeous vocal performances all through the cast album. The music itself is definitely unique, with the closest to a traditional show tune probably being the beautiful “Sun Song.” McLean’s score screams “THIS IS EXPERIMENTAL,” but mostly in a good way. This is not the kind of show you’ll want to listen to for fun, but it does have a lot to say about wanting to be the best version of yourself and that’s nothing to sneer at.

I do want to say that you shouldn’t let religion scare you away from this album; the Almighty is barely mentioned. While In the Green is a musical about nuns (and one of them a saint at that!) the theme has much more to do with the earthly experience of trauma than church. Think of it as being about a kind of medieval therapy. I found it surprisingly enjoyable, especially the songs “Ritual,” “Light Undercover,” and “The Ripening.”

In the Green is exactly the kind of musical I hoped to discover when I started this blog. It’s quirky with something to say to which we can all relate. I hope we hear more from Grace McLean as a composer in the future. She’s really got what it takes.

Musical: In the Green

Cast Album I Listened To: 2019 Original Off-Broadway Cast

Music and Lyrics: Grace McLean

Opening Performance: June 27, 2019, Claire Tow Theater, New York City

Highlights: “Ritual,” “Sun Song,” “Light Undercover,” and “The Ripening.”

Overall Impression: This is a gorgeous effort to bring attention to a woman who’s been unfairly ignored for nearly a millennium. While the album isn’t perfect, it does its best to showcase the tremendous talent of its cast and composer.

Introducing Barbra Streisand…

There is an endless list of entertainers that it’s difficult to imagine the world without: Elvis Presley, Judy Garland, Charlie Chaplin, Michael Jackson, Audrey Hepburn, Tom Hanks, to name just a few. Heck, I even have a hard time remembering life before Lady Gaga. One of the shiniest names on that list has to be Barbra Streisand. The multi-talented, EGOT-holding force of nature is one of the best-selling female artists of all time and the only artist to have achieved a number-one-selling album in each of the last six decades. In short, she’s the very definition of a legend. But even legends have to start somewhere.

Streisand got her start on Broadway as a teenager in a supporting role in the little known musical I Can Get It for You Wholesale, a comedy about the rise and fall of a  ruthless young businessman in the New York City garment industry during the Great Depression. The musical opened on March 22, 1962 at the Schubert Theatre. It later transferred to the Broadway Theatre where it closed after 300 performances. The music and lyrics were both by Harold Rome and in addition to young Streisand, the original cast included Elliott Gould, Lillian Roth, and Marilyn Cooper. There has yet to be a revival or a production in the West End, making the 1962 cast recording the only cast album for this show.

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Streisand’s is the first voice we hear on the album. Keeping in mind her age (she was 19 when the show opened) and the fact that this is her professional recording debut, it is a remarkable first impression. Her voice sounds well beyond its years and her natural comedic timing is just as perfect as ever. It’s difficult to ignore the lack of her signature belting and the limited range the music allows to show off her vocals. But this album isn’t about her, despite the star power she has today.

The music for I Can Get It for You Wholesale uses traditional Jewish melodies to enjoyable effect. “Momma, Momma, Momma” and “The Family Way” particularly evoke folk song sentiments, while “A Gift Today” has the somber melody of an ancient hymn. Rome’s songs can be gorgeous and his lyrics poignant, but the two do not always mix in a way that is memorable. A notable exception is “Miss Marmelstein,” performed by Streisand, which has been stuck in my head since I first heard it. It is no coincidence that it is the best known song from the musical. I also found “What’s in It for Me?” to be a fun show tune discovery and “Have I Told You Lately?” as sweet as any Broadway love song from the era.

Unfortunately, the rest of the songs are largely forgettable. As much as I liked the melodies, they just don’t work as the kind of show tunes you’ll want to sing in the shower, which is what they are trying to be. Still, the album’s significance to entertainment history is enough for me to recommend it.

For all the cast album’s shortcomings, I Can Get It for You Wholesale sure worked out for Streisand. She married its leading man Elliott Gould in 1963 and released her debut album the same year, launching a career that has been one of the most successful and lauded in history. Indeed, this small musical has made a massive impact on American entertainment, you just wouldn’t notice.

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Musical: I Can Get It for You Wholesale

Cast Album I Listened To: 1962 Original Broadway Cast

Music and Lyrics: Harold Rome

Opening Performance: March 22, 1962, Shubert Theatre, New York City

Song You Might Know: “Miss Marmelstein”

Highlights: “Have I Told You Lately?,” “Miss Marmelstein,” “What’s in It for Me?”

Overall Impression: This one is really all about two things: the music’s Jewish influence and Barbra Streisand. It’s a decent album, but I’m not sure I’d need a copy in my collection if not for it being Streisand’s debut.

How To Lift Yourself Up With Ease

Every once in a while I get bored and peruse the Internet for new music. One such boredom spell hit me this week and I noticed that a shiny new cast album had just recently been released. Of course, I had to give it a listen! This was an extra exciting endeavor since it is the first truly new musical I am listening to for this blog.

I vaguely remember the movie Calendar Girls being released back in 2003. The trailer has left me with memories of a lot of flowers and older women without body shame, so all good things. Why not turn such a movie with such a happy-feeling trailer into a stage musical? I can’t think of a single reason.

Calendar Girls opened at the West End’s Phoenix Theatre on February 21, 2017, and closed that July. The music and lyrics were co-written by Tim Firth and Gary Barlow. It is based on the true story of a group of Yorkshire women who tastefully posed nude for a calendar in order to raise funds for a hospital. The musical’s sole cast album was released on March 9, 2018.

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It’s been a busy week, so it actually took me two days to listen to the original London cast album. The music is largely piano driven and the voices are charming. The lyrics are probably the strongest thing about this recording. They are relentlessly encouraging and challenge those who would age gracefully to age daringly. The thing oozes positive vibes and then pairs them with simple melodies that I have been humming all day. If that’s not how a musical passes the test I don’t know what is. Even having never seen the movie, I was able to follow the story fairly well thanks to the amount of talking on the recording. There is quite a bit of it and it is helpful to a point, but a lot of these songs could stand on the their own without the extra context.

To be frank, the vocal performances are not extraordinary, but they’re also not pretending to be. The decision to give characters based on real people songs that real people can actually sing may have been unconscious, but it speaks volumes for both representation and accessibility. This is a musical that community theaters everywhere should be scrambling to produce.

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The album’s greatest flaw is its length. It clocks in at an hour and a half. AN HOUR AND A HALF! Only the likes of Les Mis have any business being that long. A few moral quandaries and a photo shoot do not exactly require a story telling capacity to rival the French Revolution. Granted, the last few songs are demos added on as bonus tracks, but still. They could have been cut and the whole thing would have benefited.

That said, the amount of can-do attitude packed into that hour and a half cannot be overstated. There’s even a song comparing the grief of losing a spouse to climbing mountains and battling piranhas. The gist is that it’s a big deal, but you can get through it. That’s the resounding theme here; these ladies are ready for anything life throws at them. In short, they are pretty awesome.

This is not an album that I can see myself listening to again and again, but is something I am definitely going to dust off every so often. It’s got real heart and a happy energy that is often missing is modern life. Maybe I wouldn’t take my grandma to see the show, but I would play this with her in the car. It’s just an easy breezy cast album and there’s nothing wrong with that.

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Musical: Calendar Girls

Music and Lyrics by Tim Firth and Gary Barlow

Opening Performance: February 21, 2017, Phoenix Theatre, London

Cast Album I Listened To: 2017 Original London Cast

Highlights: “Who Wants a Silent Night?,” “Sunflower,” “So I’ve Had a Little Work Done”

Overall Impression: The lyrics are wonderful and would definitely come in handy if I were facing a difficult time. The music itself is pretty and simple, which is a good thing in this case.

Not Great, Not Bad, Just Nice

After exploring a couple of new-to-me musicals, I have been craving both some familiar territory and a show by an iconic composer. Into the Woods seemed to be just the thing. I am not a Sondheim connoisseur, but this show has been in my top ten since I first saw it in a local production. The original Broadway cast album has been a favorite of mine even longer, ever since I fell in love with its star, Bernadette Peters.

Everything about Into the Woods seems to be a recipe for success. Before the first curtain rose, its audiences were already familiar with its characters and themes. It draws on nostalgia and then haunts you with beautiful melodies and poignant lyrics. The stage show also has a generous helping of comedy that thankfully comes through in the albums at points, especially with regards to the Witch.

Stephen Sondheim wrote the music and lyrics for Into the Woods, which had its Broadway opening performance on November 5, 1987, at the Martin Beck Theatre. That original production ran for 765 performances, closing September 3, 1989. It tells the story of a baker and his wife who desperately want a child of their own. The plot weaves together the familiar fairy tales of Rapunzel, Cinderella, Jack and the Beanstalk, and Little Red Riding Hood. The musical made its West End debut in 1990 at the Phoenix Theatre, running for 197 performances. It has been revived a number of times, notably in 2002 on Broadway and in London in 2007, and is a popular choice for school productions. A feature film was released by Disney in 2014. Including the movie, there are four Into the Woods cast albums available.

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The 1987 original Broadway cast recording of Into the Woods opens with the classic “Once upon a time…,” which is appropriate for a couple of reasons. First, we are listening to a musical about fairy tales, and second, the story is kind of brilliant. Actually, the general plot is outlined pretty well by this album and it would not be difficult to give it a listen and know what is going on story-wise for the most part. Technically, the Baker and his Wife lead the cast, but it’s clear after the first five minutes that Bernadette Peters (as the Witch) is the star here. From the moment she delivers the famous “Witch’s Rap” to her soaring vocals on “Stay With Me,” her presence is gigantic throughout the album. Still, I have to give the award for best song on the OBCR to Chuck Wagner and Robert Westenberg’s duet of “Agony.” In addition to being a funny song built around sibling rivalry, Wagner and Westenberg each have stunning voices.  Sadly, this album would have benefited from some better sound engineering, as some of the tracks give the impression of having been recorded in a giant tin can. My only other real issue with this album is the way some of the songs are packaged on the same tracks together. If I want to listen to the spectacular “Giants in the Sky” I shouldn’t have to listen to both “A Very Nice Prince” and “First Midnight” to get there.

While I had heard the OBCR many times before, this was my first time listening to the original London cast recording. Let me tell you something, this London cast album gets a fair amount of hate from Into the Woods fans but I found it very much as enjoyable as the Broadway cast album. Sure, Julia McKenzie is no Bernadette Peters, but her Witch provides just as much comic relief, if not even more. She even has a new song, “Our Little World,” which expands nicely on the Witch’s relationship with Rapunzel. The whole cast provides a mostly enjoyable listen. This recording is longer and some of the tempos could be changed for ease of listening, but overall I liked it! Best of all is that each of the songs are given their own tracks. Take note, original Broadway cast album producers.

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Before we move on to the 2002 Broadway revival cast album, it is important to note that that production was directed by James Lapine, who wrote the book for Into the Woods. Perhaps because someone with such intimate connections to the musical was in charge, its cast album suffers a bit from trying to do too much. In “Hello, Little Girl,” for example, an extra Wolf is added as are the Three Little Pigs without any reason or follow-up. That said, most of the cast gives it their all. A glaring exception is Vanessa Williams as the Witch. Her parts have been transposed to accommodate her limited vocal range, which is fine if you value star power over capable talent.

It was about halfway through the 2002 recording that I had a revelation: the music for Into the Woods is kind of boring. It doesn’t have that catchy kind of attraction that would automatically make any of its number classic show tunes and the melodies repeat often, which is common enough but monotonous. Sure, “No One is Alone” is one of the most beautiful songs around, but how often have you caught yourself singing it in the shower? Regardless, the show itself is gorgeous and deserved to be made into a movie. Whether it deserved the movie it got is another question entirely.

A film adaptation of Into the Woods was released by Disney in December of 2014. Its star packed cast includes Meryl Streep, James Corden, Emily Blunt, Anna Kendrick, and Johnny Depp. Being a Disney film, this is a thoroughly sanitized Woods. The reprise of “Agony” is gone, along with all hints of the Princes’ adultery. Jack’s long-absent father is also written out of the script and both “Ever After” and the “Act II Prologue” have been removed. But my biggest shock with this album is always how great everyone sounds. It’s clear that the cast was chosen for singing talent as much as box office draw. If I were going to introduce a child to Into the Woods, this would be the album I chose.

For all of its shortcomings, Into the Woods is a fantastic musical for which its cast albums do not do justice. It is a very close race, but I thing the 1991 original London cast just edges out the original Broadway cast for my favorite Into the Woods cast album. Although, to be fair, the OBCR is mostly carried by the venerable Peters. This has been interesting and I can’t wait to explore more Sondheim and see how his other shows measure up.

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Musical: Into the Woods

Music and Lyrics: Stephen Sondheim

Opening Performance: November 5, 1987, Martin Beck Theatre, New York City

Cast Albums I Listened To: 1987 Original Broadway Cast, 1991 Original London Cast, 2002 Broadway Revival Cast, 2014 Film Soundtrack

Highlights: “Giants in the Sky,” “On the Steps of the Palace,” “Agony,” “Your Fault,” “No One is Alone”

Honorable Mention: It’s not technically a stand-alone song, but “Witch’s Rap” is a highlight of the Prologue.

Favorite Cast Album: 1991 Original London Cast

Overall Impression: While Into the Woods is a favorite show of mine, the music does get a tad boring making the albums tedious at times. Still, it is brilliant how these fairy tales are woven together with a whole new moral.

Bravo, Bravo Giovanni!

Musical theatre and opera have a lot in common; that goes without saying. So it is inevitable that the line should blur at times. I happen to be an admirer of both art forms, so I was delighted to come across Bravo Giovanni. It is not an opera by any stretch of the imagination, but the operatic influence and elements cannot be ignored.

Bravo Giovanni was written as a crossover vehicle for opera star Cesare Siepi. It features the music of Milton Schafer and lyrics by Ronny Graham. The short-lived musical opened May 19, 1962 at the Broadhurst Theatre on Broadway. It concerns the owner of a restaurant in Rome who resorts to stealing food and supplies from the fancy dining establishment next door via a secret tunnel to stay afloat. It only ran for 76 performances and has never had a revival. Therefore, there is only one cast album.

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I have to say the quality of this album is really great. It sounds as if it could have been recorded far more recently than the sixties and many of the songs would fit in nicely at a contemporary dinner party or, as my sister would suggest, a grocery store. The music can come off as a bit all over the place (it doesn’t quite know what kind of musical it wants to be at times) but I find that keeps a fresh feeling throughout the recording. There is no show tune fatigue to be found here.

Each and every member of the cast deserves a retroactive Grammy Award for their vocal performances. Siepi has an enviable bass and puts it to good use, especially on the gorgeous “If I Were the Man.” Another spectacular performance is given by Gene Varrone on “Ah! Camminare,” performed in Italian! Michele Lee is, of course, perfection. Her “Steady, Steady” number is easily the strongest candidate here for classic show tune offering. I honestly enjoyed every single track, albeit for different reasons. In some ways it sounds more like a compilation than a coherent album, but like I said, that actually works well here.

I would love to have seen this either on stage or made into a movie. As it is, I am grateful they released a cast album for a show with such a brief run. If its lack of longevity is the result of poor ticket sales, then it seems even theatregoers get it wrong once in a while. Bravo Giovanni indeed!

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P.S. I’ve been stuck in the 1960s lately. Perhaps something a bit more modern and familiar next time, eh?

Musical: Bravo Giovanni

Music by Milton Schafer

Lyrics by Ronny Graham

Opening Performance: May 19, 1962, New York City

Cast Album I Listened To: 1962 Original Broadway Cast

Highlights: “I’m All I’ve Got,” “If I Were the Man,” “Steady, Steady,” “Ah! Camminare”

Overall Impression: The songs are gorgeous even if the flow is a little disjointed. I loved it!

Ahead of the Times

It is a very good thing that women are beginning to be given greater respect than they have in the past. Movements like #TimesUp and #MeToo have people discussing sexual assault and harassment in more ways and more often than ever before. It seems to be the never ending talk of every town, but in reality the conversation is still very new.

With all this buzz around sexual harassment and having just finished my entry on Hello, Dolly!, I thought it would be the perfect time to visit another Dolly.

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Country music legend Dolly Parton wrote the music and lyrics to 9 to 5: The Musical, which follows three women dealing with their “sexist, egotistical, lying, hypocritical bigot” of a boss. It is based on the 1980 comedy film 9 to 5, which stars Parton along with Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin. Parton’s musical version opened at the Marquis Theatre on Broadway on April 7, 2009. It was not a success and closed in September of the same year after only 148 regular performances. But now, in an era where everyone up to and including the President of the United States is finally being held responsible for their deplorable “boys’ club” behavior, we may be due for a revival.

There is only one cast album available for 9 to 5: The Musical. It opens with the sound of alarm clocks, which is surprisingly unsettling to this nine to fiver, even at 2 pm on a Saturday. Parton has written new lyrics to her classic hit “9 to 5,” leftover from the movie and used as the first song in the musical. It is a pretty good opening number and sets the scene for a workplace filled with typical anxieties.

And that’s it. That’s the only song I knew when I chose this musical. Actually, “9 to 5” and “Jolene” comprise my entire familiarity with Parton’s catalog (not counting a certain Whitney Houston cover). So this is exciting!

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The original Broadway cast of 9 to 5 was composed of some surprisingly big names. Arguably the biggest of these is Allison Janney in the role of Violet. She is joined by Stephanie J. Block as Judy, Megan Hilty as Doralee, and Marc Kudisch as their boss, Mr. Hart. Just like the original movie, the stage musical focuses on Violet, Judy, and Doralee’s fantasy plots for revenge on Mr. Hart for his chronic sexist behavior. Each fantasy is, of course, given its own musical number. “The Dance of Death,” “Cowgirl’s Revenge,” and “Potion Notion” are all fun songs about murder, a startlingly common theme for show tunes. But even with these numbers, the music overall is safe and forgettable. There are no earworms in the score and certainly nothing screaming to be a modern pop hit.

That’s not to say the musical doesn’t have its better moments. Kudisch is downright creepy in his stellar portrayal of Mr. Hart which made me cringe (I mean “cringe” as a compliment to Kudisch). Hilty has her first solo number on “Backwoods Barbie,” which Parton herself also recorded for her album of the same name. Is Hilty doing a Dolly Parton impression throughout the show? Yes. Is it convincing? Yes. Do I love it despite wanting something fresh? Yes, absolutely. Another highlight is Janney’s performance of “One of the Boys,” in which she fantasizes about being a celebrated CEO. I also enjoyed the finale, which is gospel-tinged version of “9 to 5.”

Not inspiring me to dance and sing along is not the worst thing that could have happened to this musical. Thankfully, the story’s most sensitive subject matter is directly addressed on a few numbers. The best of these is “Shine Like the Sun.” Oh, sure, it sounds like the kind of song that middle school girls perform at talent shows, and it is! Because it has a lot more heart than the rest of Parton’s compositions. Had 9 to 5: The Musical premiered in the past year, “Shine Like the Sun” would be performed at the Tony Awards with a chorus of sexual assault survivors. As it is, the conversation had not yet happened and the 9 to 5 Tony performance was restricted to the already famous opening number. Another missed opportunity for the short-lived Broadway show.

9 to 5: The Musical‘s cast album was largely a disappointment. The songs are too safe and the vocal performances only adequate. Still, I think that a revival could do well with a few tweaks. I’m all for second chances and Parton deserves one here. The time has never been more right to try 9 to 5 again.

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Musical: 9 to 5: The Musical

Music and Lyrics by Dolly Parton

Opening Performance: April 30, 2009, New York City

Cast Album I Listened To: 2009 Original Broadway Cast

Songs You Might Know: “9 to 5,” “Backwoods Barbie”

Highlights: “Backwoods Barbie,” “Shine Like the Sun,” “One of the Boys”

Overall Impression: The music is sometimes fun but always safe. If the show were to run today, I think it would be a much bigger hit.