Una Verdadera Obra Maestra

Every once in a while, I am introduced to a musical and genuinely like it, but then go on to ignore it for way too long after that initial spark dies out. One such victim of this unjust habit of mine is In the Heights. So, when my trusty random number generator landed on it the other day, I was ecstatic! “Here’s my chance,” I said to me, “to renew my love for this masterpiece! And this time, I am not throwing away my sh–,” wait… wrong musical. But the reference is apt considering my attitude towards the show had cooled considerably and now is just as fresh as ever, maybe even more so!

In the Heights is probably most famous for being the first major work of theatre to feature music and lyrics by Lin-Manuel Miranda. The book, by Quiara Alegría Hudes, lays out a complicated plot concerning a small Dominican community who live on a corner in the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan. The show opened on Broadway on March 9, 2008, and successfully ran until closing in January of 2011. It was nominated for an astounding 13 Tony Awards and took home four, including Best Musical and Best Original Score. There was also a hit production in the West End as well as several others around the world, but the original Broadway production is the only one with a cast album. So, let’s talk about it.

The first few notes of the In the Heights cast album speak to the heart of every show tune enthusiast the world over. That’s because they harken back to West Side Story, emulating the beginning notes of “America.” It beautifully sets the theme before a single lyric is sung. Right away, we know that we are about to observe a world full of people with a marginalized identity who are vacillating between two cultures. Honestly, it’s one of my favorite beginnings to a musical and the rest of the album does not disappoint either. The music is a wonderful mix of hip-hop, pop, and salsa, and the lyrics explore the souls of the characters so thoroughly that you may actually think you’re in Washington Heights! To get that from a cast album is pretty magical and a testament to Lin-Manuel Miranda’s talent as a songwriter.

I had a very hard time choosing my song highlights this time because there isn’t a dud in the show. Before revisiting In the Heights for this project, I had forgotten how drawn I am to the second number on the album, which is “Breathe,” performed by the incredible Mandy Gonzalez as Nina. Its poignant theme of being disappointed in oneself yet determined to turn things around is enough to make is a shoo-in for my shortlist. Mandy Gonzalez’s performance doesn’t hurt, either. I also decided to go with the salsa infused “When You’re Home” and “Carnaval Del Barrio,” both of which had me dancing with each listen. The beautiful and sweet “Sunrise” is an absolute must listen and I decided to close out my picks with another heart-tugging Mandy Gonzalez performance, “Everything I Know.” Truth be told, the album is best enjoyed as a whole, but I think those five songs give a pretty good taste of this refreshing show.

If there is a drawback to this cast album, it’s the bonus tracks. Yes, I know I complained about bonus tracks in my last post as well, but that was about lazy placement. These here are redundant “radio mixes” that don’t add anything to the work. Still, everything before them is as perfect as can be, so I’ll happily let them slide.

All that said, we are leaving Washington Heights for now. But good news! We are finally getting an In the Heights film adaptation this year. I can’t wait to not only see it, but also talk about its soundtrack here. In the meantime, I am thankful to this blog for giving me cause to rediscover a real masterpiece of American theatre. In the Heights is as great as ever, even if it is a bit overshadowed by its younger brother.

Musical: In the Heights

Cast Album I Listened To: 2008 Original Broadway Cast

Music and Lyrics: Lin-Manuel Miranda

Opening Performance: March 9, 2008, Richard Rodgers Theatre, New York City

Highlights: “Breathe,” “When You’re Home,” “Sunrise,” “Carnaval Del Barrio,” and “Everything I Know.”

Overall Impression: As far as cast albums go, this one does a near perfect job of bringing you into the show’s world. I am excited to rediscover more shows that I have loved and grow my appreciation for them as I continue this project!

2 thoughts on “Una Verdadera Obra Maestra

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