Introducing Barbra Streisand…

There is an endless list of entertainers that it’s difficult to imagine the world without: Elvis Presley, Judy Garland, Charlie Chaplin, Michael Jackson, Audrey Hepburn, Tom Hanks, to name just a few. Heck, I even have a hard time remembering life before Lady Gaga. One of the shiniest names on that list has to be Barbra Streisand. The multi-talented, EGOT-holding force of nature is one of the best-selling female artists of all time and the only artist to have achieved a number-one-selling album in each of the last six decades. In short, she’s the very definition of a legend. But even legends have to start somewhere.

Streisand got her start on Broadway as a teenager in a supporting role in the little known musical I Can Get It for You Wholesale, a comedy about the rise and fall of a  ruthless young businessman in the New York City garment industry during the Great Depression. The musical opened on March 22, 1962 at the Schubert Theatre. It later transferred to the Broadway Theatre where it closed after 300 performances. The music and lyrics were both by Harold Rome and in addition to young Streisand, the original cast included Elliott Gould, Lillian Roth, and Marilyn Cooper. There has yet to be a revival or a production in the West End, making the 1962 cast recording the only cast album for this show.

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Streisand’s is the first voice we hear on the album. Keeping in mind her age (she was 19 when the show opened) and the fact that this is her professional recording debut, it is a remarkable first impression. Her voice sounds well beyond its years and her natural comedic timing is just as perfect as ever. It’s difficult to ignore the lack of her signature belting and the limited range the music allows to show off her vocals. But this album isn’t about her, despite the star power she has today.

The music for I Can Get It for You Wholesale uses traditional Jewish melodies to enjoyable effect. “Momma, Momma, Momma” and “The Family Way” particularly evoke folk song sentiments, while “A Gift Today” has the somber melody of an ancient hymn. Rome’s songs can be gorgeous and his lyrics poignant, but the two do not always mix in a way that is memorable. A notable exception is “Miss Marmelstein,” performed by Streisand, which has been stuck in my head since I first heard it. It is no coincidence that it is the best known song from the musical. I also found “What’s in It for Me?” to be a fun show tune discovery and “Have I Told You Lately?” as sweet as any Broadway love song from the era.

Unfortunately, the rest of the songs are largely forgettable. As much as I liked the melodies, they just don’t work as the kind of show tunes you’ll want to sing in the shower, which is what they are trying to be. Still, the album’s significance to entertainment history is enough for me to recommend it.

For all the cast album’s shortcomings, I Can Get It for You Wholesale sure worked out for Streisand. She married its leading man Elliott Gould in 1963 and released her debut album the same year, launching a career that has been one of the most successful and lauded in history. Indeed, this small musical has made a massive impact on American entertainment, you just wouldn’t notice.

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Musical: I Can Get It for You Wholesale

Cast Album I Listened To: 1962 Original Broadway Cast

Music and Lyrics: Harold Rome

Opening Performance: March 22, 1962, Shubert Theatre, New York City

Song You Might Know: “Miss Marmelstein”

Highlights: “Have I Told You Lately?,” “Miss Marmelstein,” “What’s in It for Me?”

Overall Impression: This one is really all about two things: the music’s Jewish influence and Barbra Streisand. It’s a decent album, but I’m not sure I’d need a copy in my collection if not for it being Streisand’s debut.

“Shakespeare’s Forgotten Rock and Roll Masterpiece”

Musical theatre, like any art form, can be very weird. Oftentimes the line between weird and genius is so blurry that is almost almost invisible. Such is the case with Return to the Forbidden Planet, billed as “Shakespeare’s forgotten rock and roll masterpiece.”

Return to the Forbidden Planet is a jukebox musical featuring rock and roll songs from the 1950s and 60s. It is based on Shakespeare’s The Tempest and the film Forbidden Planet. The musical takes place on the planet D’Illyria, home of the mad scientist Dr. Prospero and his daughter who were marooned there by Dr. Prospero’s wife, Gloria. It began as an open-air performance and had its official West End premiere at London’s Cambridge Theatre in September of 1989. It won that year’s Olivier Award for Best New Musical. An Australian tour followed in 1991, as did an off-Broadway production the same year. The show has been revived for tours and regional productions numerous times thanks in large part to its use of camp and popular songs. Live recordings of both the original London and Australian casts serve as the musical’s cast albums.

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Tracking down these albums wasn’t exactly easy; they are not available for streaming in the U.S. so I ending up having to order them both on CD. This presented a problem when I realized that the only CD player I have is in my car. I found myself making excuses to drive in order to finish both of the recordings and in the end it still took me several days. My short commute to work is both a blessing and a curse sometimes…

I have to say that even though I am not a fan of rock and roll, I really enjoyed these albums! The London recording is particularly fun, though it features less story and jokes than the Australian cast. Both of the cast albums were recorded during live performances, a first for this blog, so the stellar vocal performances are especially impressive. The sound quality is so good on both that I didn’t even realize they were live until the first round of applause form the audience. Indeed, either of these albums would be a fine addition to any collection.

The songs themselves are a carousel of familiar rock and roll tunes. Everything from “Great Balls of Fire” to “Monster Mash” are featured. Other songs include a poignant duet of “It’s a Man’s Man’s Man’s World,” as well as “She’s Not There,” “Wipe Out,” “Great Balls of Fire,” “A Teenager in Love,” and many more. Listening is a fun time and the positive energy in both audiences is palpable.

Prepare yourself though: Return to the Forbidden Planet is dripping with camp. That is, the jokes are hilariously horrible. “Two beeps or not two beeps?” is just one in a slew of Shakespeare puns that have been tailored to work in outer space. As a fan of bad humor, I found this delightful.

Even having never seen it, I can tell you that this is one weird, wacky show. I am still not a fan of either rock and roll or jukebox musicals, but I think I could be a fan of Return to the Forbidden Planet. Here’s hoping I can catch a production sometime soon.

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Musical: Return to the Forbidden Planet

Cast Albums I Listened To: 1989 Original London Cast, 1991 Australian Cast

Music and Lyrics: Various

Opening Performance: September, 1989, Cambridge Theatre, London

Highlights: “Great Balls of Fire,” “A Teenager in Love,” “She’s Not There”

Favorite Cast Album: 1989 Original London Cast

Overall Impression: It seems like a fun musical that is as familiar as it is foreign. Definitely my most unique experience so far.